California hit-and-run Legislation

August 8,2014

SACRAMENTO – The state Senate of California will decide whether a loophole should be closed which allows hit-and-run drivers who flee the scene of an accident to avoid prosecution. Currently, it is legally acceptable for a perpetrator who left the scene of a hit-and-run to return afterwards and work out some type of deal with the victim.

As one might imagine this loophole opens the floodgates to perpetrators offering money or other forms of compensation on-scene to victims.

This bill (A.B. 2673) brought forward by the Gardena’s Democrat Assemblymember Steven Bradford is one of many recent bills aimed to crack down on hit-and-run drivers. Another being pushed through the process A.B. 47 which creates a highway alert system designed to help catch hit-and-run drivers. Advocates say that a similar system implemented in 2012 in Denver increased the apprehension rate for hit-and-run drivers from 20% to 76% in the years since it’s institution. Given that California currently has the same 20% apprehension rate, lawmakers are looking to increase that dismal number.

In addition to these bills, A.B. 1532 increases the penalties for convicted hit-and-run drivers. Included in the penalties are added fines as well as automatic suspension of the perpetrators driver’s license if he leaves the scene of a crash, regardless of any injuries.

From the appearance of things, it seems that these bills which tighten up the law around hit-and-run accidents will pass mostly unchallenged. If you have an accident which involves injury or death to someone, never flee the accident. These issues must be faced head-on rather or you’ll be causing yourself decades of guilt, unease and anxiety.

John Rosenbaum is a successful Orange County attorney dealing regularly with personal injury and workers compensation cases. As evidenced by a 99.8% success rate, our firm is relentless in pursuit of justice and compensation on behalf of our clients.

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